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  • Basic tools for maintaining the 3D printer

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        [meta_title] => Basic tools for maintaining the 3D printer
        [meta_description] => In the world of 3D printing there is an aspect that is not mentioned very often and that is of vital importance: having the basic tools for the maintenance of the 3D printer.
        [short_description] => In the world of 3D printing there is an aspect that is not mentioned very often and that is of vital importance: having the basic tools for the maintenance of the 3D printer.
        [content] => 

    Herramientas para mantenimiento impresión 3D

    In the world of 3D printing there is an aspect that is not mentioned very often and that is of vital importance: having the basic tools for the maintenance of the 3D printer.

    Like any other machine, 3D printers need maintenance after certain hours of operation, in which they must clean and lubricate or replace any item that is worn, such as nozzle or Heat Break.

    Here are the basic tools that are needed to properly maintain your printer:

    Lubricant for 3D printers

    The lubricant for 3D printers SuperLube has a good resistance to heat, so that although it is used in printers with hot bed the lubricant does not tend to become liquid and does not start to drip on the printing base. The use of this lubricant is recommended to avoid wear and reduce friction in bearings and rods, which also increases the duration of the engines when subjected to a lower load.

    Brushes for cleaning

    The cleaning brushes (nylon, brass and steel) are ideal for cleaning all the components and surfaces that make up the 3D printer. With the cleaning brushes you can access any corner of the 3D printer with great ease and thus reduce time and money in maintenance. The brushes for cleaning (brass) are very used for cleaning the outside of the nozzles, because simply by heating the nozzle a bit and passing the brush through it, without applying excessive force, you get a quick clean.

    3D printer cleaner

    Many users of 3D printers, for convenience or to save time, use the fixing sprays (3DLac, Dimafix or PrintaFix) without removing the printing base of the 3D printer, leaving remains of the fixator everywhere and giving rise to areas where it adheres dust, which affects the operation of crucial elements such as HotEnd fans, layer fans, gears, spindles, etc. For this reason, the use of the 3D printer cleaner is vital. With this aqueous solution, any surface of the 3D printer can be cleaned easily and without causing any damage.

    Filament cleaner

    This tool is essential, since most plastic filaments are often statically charged and attract all kinds of waste from the working environment towards the filament. Using a filament cleaner removes all types of dirt (lint, dust or other dirt) before the filament enters the extruder, increasing the duration of the same and the nozzle of the 3D printer, as well as avoiding jams caused by accumulation of dirt.

    Cleaning filament

    The cleaning filament is one of the basic maintenance elements for 3D printing. This filament removes residual material that remains inside the extruder and can be applied in the transition between two different materials that work at different temperatures, or at the end of printing. The use of this tool ensures that the flow is smooth, continuous and free of jams, in addition to extending the life of the HotEnd.

    Precise tweezers

    Precise tweezers should be made of high quality stainless steel with an anti-acid, antimagnetic and antistatic coating. That they are free of electrostatic discharges (ESD) favors the use of precision clamps in contact with electronic and electrical elements sensitive to this type of discharges, giving total security to carry out maintenance operations at any point of the 3D printer.

    Cutting pliers

    In the FDM technology, filament cutting pliers are an indispensable tool in day to day life. They have been specifically designed to cut plastic filament with an acute angle (pointed), essential to get properly introduce the filament by the guidance system of the extrusion part of the 3D printer. In addition, they are widely used to cut the supports generated in pieces made in SLA technology.

    Caliper

    In the world of 3D printing, caliper is a very useful tool to check diameters and important distances between components. This tool is highly recommended to verify the diameter of the filament, components, state of the nozzle and ensure the same separation between connected elements, as for example between the lateral guides of the z-axis.

    Allen wrenches

    The Allen keys are an essential tool for all users of a 3D printer, since most of them contain a large number of hexagonal Allen type screws. Thanks to this tool, any user can perform any maintenance operation on any 3D printer, from the replacement of a heating cartridge or a thermistor cartridge, to the total disassembly of the printer.

    Adjustable spanner

    Designated as one of the tools that should not be missing in any workplace, the adjustable spanner is valid for any type of screw with external hexagonal head or parallelepiped shaped. In 3D printing it is very used to hold the heater block of the extruder and change the nozzle in a simple way, avoiding large deviations of the heater block and the nozzle, giving a process of leveling the base much faster and easier.

    Pliers

    Pliers are another indispensable tool for every user. Its use extends to all types of action and maintenance on the 3D printer, such as: hold the heater block to change the nozzle, cut wires as electrical wire for repairs to the electronics, access the interior of a hole of a piece printed to remove the supports and accurately grasp small elements such as nozzles.

    Feeler gauge

    The feeler gauge are ideal to give a margin of separation between elements that fit together or to adjust with precision the distance between two elements. For example: to separate the exact length of the nozzle from the base in order to get a good impression, or for the correct assembly of the extruder and the HotEnd, where it is necessary to comply with the gaps that manufacturers indicate in their assembly manuals to achieve the correct functioning of all the elements that form them.

    From our experience, having these basic tools allows you to keep the 3D printer fully operational at all times, without losing long time in making repairs or maintenance for lack of basic tools.

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    [meta_keyword] => [id_category] => 2 [link_rewrite] => 3D-printer-maintenance-tools [cat_name] => Tips [cat_link_rewrite] => tips [lastname] => Filament [firstname] => Admin [post_img] => 42 [created] => 2018-10-01 13:00:17 [totalcomment] => 0 ) 1
    In the world of 3D printing there is an aspect that is not mentioned very often and that is of vital importance: having the basic tools for the maintenance of the 3D printer. Leer más…

    Is your 3D printer compatible with advanced materials?

    Array
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        [id_post] => 41
        [is_featured] => 0
        [viewed] => 786
        [meta_title] => Is your 3D printer compatible with advanced materials?
        [meta_description] => The world of 3D printing is constantly advancing and there are more and more materials on the market. Thanks to the uninterrupted development of this technology has born a new category of materials and 3D printers, advanced materials and advanced industrial 3D printers.
        [short_description] => The world of 3D printing is constantly advancing and there are more and more materials on the market. Thanks to the uninterrupted development of this technology has born a new category of materials and 3D printers, advanced materials and advanced industrial 3D printers.
        [content] => 

    The world of 3D printing is constantly advancing and there are more and more materials on the market. Thanks to the uninterrupted development of this technology has born a new category of materials, advanced materials.

    Advanced materials are those that present the best and greatest technical properties, which are increasingly demanded by all the field of industry and many other sectors, such as medicine. Within this category are materials of a single composition (PEI Ultem 1010, PEKK, ABS ESD)  and other materials alloyed with some type of fiber (PEI CF, PEKK CF, XSTRAND GF30-PP, XSTRAND GF30-PA6, PETG CF, PETG AFABS CF or ABS CAF) or each other (PC/PTFE). Among the advanced materials include the materials belonging to the PAEK family (PEI Ultem 1010PEKK and PEEK) and the XSTRAND GF30-PA6 and XSTRAND GF30-PP.

    Before starting with the characteristics that a 3D printer must have to print advanced materials we must make a classification: On the one hand the materials of the PAEK family (PEI Ultem 1010PEKK and PEEK) and on the other the rest of materials. Next, we explain the reason for this separation and the characteristics necessary to use them.

    Materials of the PAEK family:

    The materials that belong to this family are semicrystalline plastics that resist high temperatures (close to 200ºC) maintaining high values of mechanical resistance and fireproofing. All this affects the time to print these materials, since you need advanced 3d printers and personnel with a great knowledge on the subject. The PEI (Ultem 1010)PEKK and PEKK are printed at almost 400 °C extruder, at 150 °C base and with a heating chamber at 80 °C. Apart from these temperature values, a series of filters are needed for the gases that are released during 3D printing. For all the above, these materials are used, as a rule, by large companies worldwide, such as Airbus, which have the technology and demand for parts with the characteristics of the PAEK family materials. If you want to know more about the materials of the PAEK family you can read our article "PAEK filaments in 3D printing".

     

    Materials that do not belong to the PAEK family:

    To use the rest of advanced materials the temperature values are not so high, even many can be used by 3D pirnters and users accustomed to using ABSASA and nylons. For many of these materials the extrusion temperature does not exceed 250-270 °C or 80-110 °C, values that are achieved by many current 3D printers without problems, such as the BCN Sigma, the BCN Sigmax or the Tumaker Voladora. If your 3D printer does not reach this extrusion temperature it is possible to increase its potential thanks to the Kit PT100, thus reaching 400 ºC. Once this is clear, the elimination of any current of air with a closed case 3D printer is key to obtain a good result and avoid problems of warping, cracking or directly that the piece does not adhere to the base. Continuing with this theme, the adhesion to the base can be improved both with single-use adhesive products (3DLac, DimaFix, Magigoo, etc) and with permanent elements that even help to separate the piece once printing is finished (BluidTak FlexPlate).

     

    As always we recommend using quality 3D printers, with certificates that certify the correct functioning and that pass quality and safety controls (CE certificate). For example, the 3NTR A4 would be an ideal 3D printer for printing the advanced materials of the PAEK family (PEIPEKK and PEEK) and the BCN Sigma, the BNC Sigmax or the Tumaker Voladora for the rest of the advanced materials. For users who do not know what 3D printer they should buy based on their use, we recommend you read our article "What 3D printer buy?".

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    Subscribe to our monthly newsletter and you will receive every month in your email the latest news and tips on 3D printing.

    * By registering accept our privacy policy.

    [meta_keyword] => [id_category] => 2 [link_rewrite] => 3d-printer-compatible-advanced-materials [cat_name] => Tips [cat_link_rewrite] => tips [lastname] => Filament [firstname] => Admin [post_img] => 41 [created] => 2018-08-31 17:06:22 [totalcomment] => 0 ) 1
    The world of 3D printing is constantly advancing and there are more and more materials on the market. Thanks to the uninterrupted development of this technology has born a new category of materials and 3D printers, advanced materials and advanced industrial 3D printers. Leer más…

    PAEK filaments in 3D printing

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        [id_post] => 39
        [is_featured] => 0
        [viewed] => 1818
        [meta_title] => PAEK filaments in 3D printing
        [meta_description] => We explain the characteristics and main uses of the advanced filaments PAEK, a family of semi-crystalline plastics that offer interesting industrial and commercial applications with 3D printing.
        [short_description] => We explain the characteristics and main uses of the advanced filaments PAEK, a family of semi-crystalline plastics that offer interesting industrial and commercial applications with 3D printing.
        [content] => 

    In the world of 3D printing FDM/FFF has been for a few years a family of materials that clearly stands out above all, the family PAEK (polyaryletherketone or polyaryl ether ketone). The materials that belong to this class are semi-crystalline plastics, which resist high temperature (near 200ºC) maintaining high values of mechanical resistance.

    Within the PAEK family exists the PEEK, the PEKK and the PEI (ULTEM 1010 and ULTEM 9085). All these have high mechanical strength, chemical resistance and high flammability temperature.

     

    1-PEEK filament (PolyEtherEtherKetone)

    The PEEK (PolyEtherEtherKetone) is the most crystalline of the three materials. This indicates that it has the highest values of mechanical strength of all (without taking into account alloys with carbon fiber). But this presents a problem, because the molecules follow a pattern of repetitive ordering in the three dimensions of space in the solid state, it is more unstable at the time of melting. This implies a high difficulty of using the PEEK filament in 3D printing even for expert users with advanced 3D printers.

     

    2-PEKK filament (PolyEtherKetoneKetone)

    PEKK (PolyEtherKetoneKetone) has a semicrystalline structure (less crystalline than PEEK). This type of structure appears when a material has two clearly defined regions, an amorphous and a crystalline one. This structural condition offers an increase in the ease of printing (lower crystallization rate) maintaining similar resistance values and even higher than those of the PEEK.

    The PEKK stands out above the PEEK in its resistance to compression, being up to 80% higher. In addition, this type of filament has a chemical resistance to a huge amount of fluids: halogen hydrocarbons (benzene), automotive fluids (coolant), alcohol and aqueous solutions (sea water).

    Applications of the PEKK

    The use of PEKK is highly widespread, from medicine to military applications. Its potential is such that even NASA uses this material in the 3D prints it makes in outer space. In medicine some development centers have created knees, hips and other types of functional implants with a resounding success in their patients. The union of all its advantages has helped the development of light, resistant and anti-reflective military helmets to avoid being discovered by the light emitted by an enemy lantern. Finally, large aeronautical companies use the PEKK to make functional pieces for their aircraft.

    3-PEI filament (ULTEM 1010 and ULTEM 9085)

    The PEI (ULTEM 1010 and ULTEM 9085) is the most modified material within the PAEK family, even coming to have the designation of resin by experts in the field. The thermal resistance of this material is one of the highest in the field of 3D printing FDM/FFF, having a glass transition temperature of 215ºC and a maximum constant working temperature with a pressure of 0.45MPa of 200ºC

    The advantage of PEI is that at these temperatures the mechanical properties hardly change. This is because its great dimensional stability maintains the structural shape even when raising the temperature, something unthinkable with the majority of existing materials in 3D FDM/FFF printing.

    Applications of the PEI

    The ULTEM 1010 is commonly used to make short cycle injection molding tools, carbon fiber lamination tools and other types of molds that are subject to high pressure and temperature values (Autoclave). Within this type of high strength molds are those used for the vulcanization process of plastics, such as rubber. Thanks to PEI ULTEM 1010 molds can be made faster, easier and cheaper than current steel molds. On the other hand, the ULTEM 9085 is the revelation material of the aeronautics industry. Its thermal resistance, chemical resistance, resistance to breakage and high performance make it possible for this material to meet the most stringent testing and traceability criteria required by the aerospace industry and the regulatory agencies of the certificates.

    Impresoras compatibles con filamentos avanzados:

    Continuous innovation in the improvement of materials

    Large filament manufacturers such as French Nanovia have revolutionized the market by improving both PEKK and PEI (ULTEM 1010) with carbon fiber. Carbon fiber is a pseudo-amorphous material that offers these materials a lower melting point, slower crystallization and maintains the high crystallization temperature (Tg=160ºC), this translates into an increase in the ease of printing. Besides, this union also enhances the structural stability, improving the mechanical properties. For all the above, the PEKK CF and the PEI CF have earned a place in the category of the most powerful and easy to use materials within 3D printing FDM/FFF. In addition, these two materials compete on a general level with the thermoplastics most used in the engineering industry (polysulfones, polyphenylene sulphides and polyketones).

    PEI CF

    Image 2: PEI CF. Source: Nanovia

     

    Requirements for the use of PAEK Materials

    Finally we must mention that the use of these advanced materials is for experienced users with advanced technology 3D printers. The minimum requirements that a 3D FDM/FFF printer must have to use these materials are: Extruder temperature 370-400ºC, base temperature higher than 150ºC, chamber temperature higher than 80ºC. These values are necessary due to the sensitivity of structural deformation in contact with air zones at different temperatures of these materials.

    The final conclusion is that all materials belonging to the PAEK family (PEEK, PEKK, PEI, PEKK CF, PEI CF) are at the top of industrial use thanks to their high flammability temperature, their chemical resistance, their resistance mechanical and its good strength/weight ratio.

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    [meta_keyword] => [id_category] => 3 [link_rewrite] => paek-filaments-3d-printing [cat_name] => Materials [cat_link_rewrite] => materials [lastname] => Filament [firstname] => Admin [post_img] => 39 [created] => 2018-07-27 09:08:39 [totalcomment] => 0 ) 1
    We explain the characteristics and main uses of the advanced filaments PAEK, a family of semi-crystalline plastics that offer interesting industrial and commercial applications with 3D printing. Leer más…

    How are FDM and SLA 3D printing technologies different?

    Array
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        [id_post] => 38
        [is_featured] => 0
        [viewed] => 2999
        [meta_title] => How are FDM and SLA 3D printing technologies different?
        [meta_description] => 3D printing isn't a recent technology as it seems, if not existing for many years, since 1986 when Chuck Hull, founder of 3D Systems, records the first 3D printer. This was a 3D SLA printer (StereoLithoGraphy), which uses a resin that solidifies by photopolymerization when a laser beam hits it.
        [short_description] => 3D printing isn't a recent technology as it seems, if not existing for many years, since 1986 when Chuck Hull, founder of 3D Systems, records the first 3D printer. This was a 3D SLA printer (StereoLithoGraphy), which uses a resin that solidifies by photopolymerization when a laser beam hits it.
        [content] => 

    FDM vs SLA 3D Printing

    3D printing isn't a recent technology as it seems, if not existing for many years, since 1986 when Chuck Hull, founder of 3D Systems, records the first 3D printer. This was a 3D SLA printer (StereoLithoGraphy), which uses a resin that solidifies by photopolymerization when a laser beam hits it. Only two years later, Scott Crump, founder of Stratasys, brings to light the first 3D FDM printer (Fuse Desposition Modeling), which is currently the best known type of 3D printer in the social field.

    The method of operation of both is similar; both types of 3D printing technologies manufacture the pieces layer by layer. The FDM deposits material throughout the area of the layer in which it is located, while the SLA solidifies the resin directly thanks to a laser beam.

    Main differences between 3D FDM and SLA printers

    Materials and colors

    The most commonly used materials with FDM printers are PLA and ABS although it's increasingly common to use advanced materials such as PETGNylon and mixtures of materials such as PC-ABS or PLA with fibers (Copper HTPLA, PLA Carbon Fiber, PLA Conductive, PLA Stainless SteelPLA wood fibers, etc). The variety of materials every day is more extensive, both in types of materials and colors.

    Most FDM printers use standard coil models that are supplied by manufacturers with filament diameters of 1.75mm or 2.85mm. The diameter of the filament is decided by the manufacturer of the FDM printers according to the type of movement (Cartesian or delta) and the type of extruder.

    1.75mm and 2.85mm filament

    Image 1: 1.75mm and 2.85mm filament

     In SLA, the variety is much more limited in both types of materials and colors. The main manufacturer of resins (FormLabs) has the widest variety of materials (Standard Resin, Engineering ResinDental Resin and Castable Resin) and very currently has the Color Kit, a base resin with a set of dyes to get the color that the user wants.

    Color Kit

    Image 2: Color Kit. Source: Formlabs

    Finishing precision

    With FDM printers it's normal to get good finishes with layer heights of 0.1mm but as long as the printed parts don't have parts with very complex shapes or small size. In these cases this type of technology is limited by the diameter of the nozzle to be able to realize the minimum thickness. When using supports of the same material as that of the piece, the surface finish is usually not uniform, requiring a post-processing in the contact area of the supports. One solution for this drawback is to use soluble support materials such as PVA or as HiPS.

    FDM great finish

    Image 3: FDM great finish. Source: Fillamentum

     In printers with SLA technology the printing precision is very high, even with complex shapes because the diameter of the laser that solidifies the resin is very small. For example, the Form 2 SLA printer can make pieces with layer heights of 0.025mm, getting final and functional pieces directly. The accuracy is such that Form 2 is capable of making jewelery and dental application models in complete detail.

    SLA great finish

    Image 4: SLA great finish. Source: FormLabs

    Adherence / elimination of supports

    Although there's a wide variety of types of materials for FDM printers, adhesion to the base is usually not a problem, especially since there are very effective products (Magigoo, PrintFix, DimaFix...) that help with adhesion. Even for materials very prone to warping, such as PP, there is already the Smart Stick that solves the problem without having to use PP sealing tape. The removal of any material from the base of an FDM printer is very simple, so much that the vast majority of times can be done by hand.

    Magigoo

    Image 5: Magigoo

     For the supports in the FDM impressions it's usually used soluble materials (HiPS or PVA) which are very easy to remove. In the case of HiPS, it's diluted in D-Limoneno and the PVA in water. These materials are very practical, especially when you want to make objects with complex shapes or internal conduits, where manual post-processing isn't able to arrive.

    D-Limonene

    Image 6: D-Limonene

     In SLA printing technology, adhesion is never a problem, but more dedication is needed when removing parts from the printing base. These are usually so attached to the base that a special spatula is needed to take them off. To part, when finishing an impression the base is impregnated with resin, needing to invest some time in cleaning it.

    In the case of SLA printers there is no printing with two different materials, which means having to remove the supports manually with pliers and even apply a post-processing to get rid of them completely.

    Post-processed

    After printing on an FDM printer, only the post-processing is necessary to remove the supports, as explained in the previous section. Materials such as ABSSmartfil E.P. and many more can be sanded to obtain a better surface finish.

    However, when you finish printing a part on an SLA printer, you must remove the surface layer of resin without solidifying it in an isopropyl alcohol bath or in a wash center such as Form Wash. Most resins can be sanded and painted once they are fully solidified.

    Form Wash

    Image 7: Form Wash. Source: FormLabs

    Conclusion

    In this case the application of each 3D printing technology is very clear; FDM printers are ideal for economical and fast prototypes, which do not need to have a great surface finish or exact precision in their measurements, although there are high precision and finished FDM printers like the Markforged.

    Markforged
    Image 6: Markforged Mark Two. Source: Makforged

     FDM printers are also very useful to get direct functional pieces thanks to the wide variety of materials that exist. On the contrary, the SLA printers are recommended to use them for pieces or objects that require a great finish with exact measurements, of the level of final pieces, but with prototype purpose, which aren't subjected to stresses or stresses.

    Currently, FormLabs has technical resins that already give the possibility of printing functional final pieces of high quality.

    Do you want to receive articles like this in your email?

    Subscribe to our monthly newsletter and you will receive every month in your email the latest news and tips on 3D printing.

    * By registering accept our privacy policy.

    [meta_keyword] => [id_category] => 2 [link_rewrite] => 3D-FDM-SLA-printing-technologies [cat_name] => Tips [cat_link_rewrite] => tips [lastname] => Filament [firstname] => Admin [post_img] => 38 [created] => 2018-05-02 17:30:49 [totalcomment] => 0 ) 1
    3D printing isn't a recent technology as it seems, if not existing for many years, since 1986 when Chuck Hull, founder of 3D Systems, records the first 3D printer. This was a 3D SLA printer (StereoLithoGraphy), which uses a resin that solidifies by photopolymerization when a laser beam hits it. Leer más…

    Risks when printing in 3D

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        [id_post] => 37
        [is_featured] => 0
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        [meta_title] => Risks when printing in 3D
        [meta_description] => Every user must take into account certain risks that may occur during 3D printing. The two main sources of risk and more common are on the one hand the gases released during the fusion of the material, and on the other the possible sources of fire by misuse of the 3D printer or the poor condition of the electronics of the same.
        [short_description] => Every user must take into account certain risks that may occur during 3D printing. The two main sources of risk and more common are on the one hand the gases released during the fusion of the material, and on the other the possible sources of fire by misuse of the 3D printer or the poor condition of the electronics of the same.
        [content] => 

    Riesgos a la hora de imprimir en 3D

    Every day 3D printing is more widespread both at the industrial level and at the domestic level, something that enhances the development of many applications in a large number of fields. At the media level only the benefits of technology stand out, but there are certain precautions that must be taken into account when it comes to starting in the world of 3D printing.

    But every user must take into account certain risks that may occur during 3D printing. The two main sources of risk and more common are on the one hand the gases released during the fusion of the material, and on the other the possible sources of fire by misuse of the 3D printer or the poor condition of the electronics of the same.

    Below, we detail the main sources of risk, as well as the precautions to be taken to avoid major problems:

    Gases and odors released

    All materials used in 3D FDM / FFF printing are plastic or contain some of this material. At this point we will focus on the three most common: PLAABS and HIPS.

    ABS and HIPS are two very widespread materials in 3D printing and also, it is very common to use them in combination, HIPS as a support material (it's dissolved in D-Limonene) and ABS as the base material. These two materials have a drawback which is that during their fusion a quantity of styrene 20 times higher than that which exists in the atmosphere is released, becoming carcinogenic in case of prolonged respiration of these emitted gases.

    The PLA is an easy-to-print material on any 3D printer and therefore, the most versatile of all existing materials for 3D printing. Regarding the waste generated, it releases lactide, an element that does not present the aforementioned problem of ABS, nor does it affect the health of people.

    In addition, industrial 3D printers sincorporate the HEPA filter, which is a type of high efficiency air filter that meets high standards. Therefore, if you don't have a closed 3D printer with a HEPA filter, the main recommendation is to keep the place of printing well ventilated (care must be taken with drafts since they cause the dreaded warping and cracking effect in open 3D printers).

    Therefore, in domestic environments, it's advisable to print filaments that don't emit odors as long as they comply with the mechanical properties.

    Possible fire sources

    Possible fire sources

    Image 1: Possible fire sources

     At this point we must take into account first of all that 3D printers that don't have the CE mark (European Certificate) don't pass any quality control, something that can become very dangerous in the event of a failure.

    Electricity

    It must be taken into account that the characteristics of the electrical network to which the 3D printer is connected must be exactly those indicated on the machine: 230 Vac, 50Hz. In addition, attention should be paid to where the 3D printer connects. If it's fed from a terminal strip with more consumers, it can cause fuses to blow or the protections of the installation to skip. Therefore, the characteristics of the line must be checked before connection. When cleaning the 3D printer, always disconnect the 3D printer from the electrical outlets to avoid accidental contacts.

    Electronics

    The use of quality electronic components, as well as cables with the appropriate section is crucial to avoid excess temperatures that can lead to the fire of the 3D printer itself and this, in turn, of everything that is around it. Another possible problem that can also cause a fire is that the temperature sensor comes out of its housing and the heating cartridge raises its temperature to the maximum, melting the elements that are around it and can cause fire.

    Hot parts

    Sometimes by inertia or forgetfulness you tend to put your hand inside the 3D printer while it's still hot, which can cause severe burns to the skin. We mustn't forget that the operation of a 3D printer is based on the principle of polymer melting, which implies a high temperature in the heating elements.

    In addition, the fact that the 3D printer is switched off or unplugged after finishing an impression doesn't imply that the heating elements are cold, so it shouldn't be touched until enough time has passed.

    Mobile parts

    For the movement of the 3 axes, as well as that of the 2 extruders, electrical motors are used step by step with high torque. When you put your fingers or your hand in the areas of the shafts, spindles and belts, it can cause entrapments, bruises and wounds, as well as burns due to the heat dissipated by the motors. Therefore, we must be very careful when entering the hand inside the 3D printer, and should only be done if strictly necessary, and to be able to be with security measures to prevent further damage in the event of an accident.

    Fixing spray

    When applying the base fixative spray (3DLacDimaFix or PrintaFixit must be done outside the 3D printer since they are highly inflammable products that in contact with high temperatures or residual electric currents can cause a flame. Although it seems incredible, there have already been more than one case where a house is burned or something worse because of the wrong process.

     

    Our particular recommendation is that at all times you have proof (especially when you have a 3D printer in a domestic environment), that this isn't a "toy", and that its operation carries associated risks. It's always better to have 3D printers with CE marking that have a closed housing and HEPA filter, and if possible in ventilated places.

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    [meta_keyword] => [id_category] => 2 [link_rewrite] => risks-printing-3d [cat_name] => Tips [cat_link_rewrite] => tips [lastname] => Filament [firstname] => Admin [post_img] => 37 [created] => 2018-03-15 12:34:32 [totalcomment] => 0 ) 1
    Every user must take into account certain risks that may occur during 3D printing. The two main sources of risk and more common are on the one hand the gases released during the fusion of the material, and on the other the possible sources of fire by misuse of the 3D printer or the poor condition of the electronics of the same. Leer más…
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